Exercise: YOUR ALLY AGAINST HAEMOPHILIA-RELATED BLEEDS

Sport – It’s Everywhere

When people aren’t in the gym, they’re playing football with their friends, or cheering for their team at a rugby match. They just can’t get enough!

But for some people with haemophilia, even a jog around the park can feel difficult at times.

exercise can prevent my bleeds? mind blown

What might surprise you, though, is that exercise is really good when managing haemophilia. It helps to strengthen the muscles around your joints and protect them. This means that if you exercise correctly, you can actually prevent joint damage in the long run.1

If that’s not an incentive to get up and moving, then we don’t know what is!

But we know it isn’t easy - up to 60% OF PEOPLE choose to manage their haemophilia by avoiding physical activity,2 and there can be a lot of reasons behind that.

IF YOU AVOID EXERCISE, WHAT'S HOLDING YOU BACK?

Select all that apply to you:

Worrying about pain,

bleeds, or injury

These worries are really common: about half of people with haemophilia are afraid that exercise may result in a bleed, pain or another physical impairment.1

Speak with your doctor or healthcare team about the sports that are right for you.

You can find tips on how to advocate for better pain management here.

Managing treatment

around exercise

It’s tough to know what to do when it comes to treatment and exercise, but always speak to your doctor or healthcare team first. They can guide you through how to use treatment to your advantage.

Limited mobility from

previous bleeds

If you’ve already had some joint bleeds, then you might be struggling with moving freely. But there are things that can help – your doctor might be able to recommend physiotherapy, which can improve the range of motion in affected joints, reduce pain, and help with balance.3

It’s impossible to prevent

damage from joint bleeds

That’s not true – although about 36% of people with haemophilia think it is. But if you treat a bleed as early as possible (usually within an hour) with the right amount of treatment, you can usually avoid severe damage to joints.2

Top Tips

For exercising with haemophilia

NHF logo

The National Hemophilia Foundation has put together a really useful guide to exercise.5

It includes a ranking of various sports and activities based on their risk level, and gives you an idea of some of the specific opportunities and associated risks.

CHECK IT OUT HERE

WHY NOT SHOW OTHERS WHAT IT'S LIKE TO LIVE WITH HAEMOPHILIA WITH A MEME

References

  1. Mulvany R et al. Phys Ther 2010; 90(4): 509–526.
  2. Nazzaro A-M et al. Am J Public Health 2006; 96(9):1618–1622.
  3. Cuesta-Barriuso R et al. Rehabil Res Pract 2013; 2013: 305249.
  4. Mayo Clinic. Exercise: 7 benefits of regular physical activity. 2018. Available from: https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/fitness/in-depth/exercise/art-20048389. Last accessed August 2019.
  5. National Hemophilia Foundation. Playing it safe. Bleeding disorder, sports and exercise. 2017. Available at: https://www.hemophilia.org/sites/default/files/document/files/Playing-It-Safe_0.pdf. Last accessed August 2019.